Slip Jig

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    • #8069
      robhanson
      Participant

      Not sure if this is related to an Irish style of playing. Some asked me what
      a slip jig was or is. In this case it’s not a fishing term.

      • This topic was modified 4 years, 4 months ago by Casey Willis. Reason: Moved to General Topics Thread
    • #8073
      Casey Willis
      Keymaster

      I’m with you, Rob. I’m more comfortable with a fishing setup than I am with an Irish slip jig. I believe it has to do with the fact that the time signature is in 9/8, hence the extra beat slips into the last measure. But don’t take my word for it, sir. I’m not a Trad Irish player.

      Maybe I’ll pose the question to Mr. Kevin Burke and see if he can give us a good answer…it may be a bit since he is on the road much of the time. Stay posted!!

      C

    • #8074
      Roland White
      Moderator

      Hi Rob and Casey, Yes Casey has the basic on a Slip Jig in that it is 9/8 time signature. Kevin has two of them in his lessons, The Butterfly and the Promenade. The Butterfly is one of the most well known Slip Jigs and Kevin gives it a very special feel with his rendition. When I learned some slip jigs I didn’t get hung up on the 9/8 part and how it worked but just tried to imitate how the tune was played, so it never seemed complicated to learn it. If Kevin chimes I’m sure he will have a some good insights to that tune form. Cheers, Roland

    • #8097
      Peter Willis
      Participant

      I’ll put my two cents in here. It’s difficult for me to count to nine while playing so I absolutely agree with Roland – just try to imitate it to start with and then you’ll get the feel for it.
      In Short, don’t count. Feel.

      • #8098
        Casey Willis
        Keymaster

        I’ll up-vote Peter’s comment, seeing as how (1) he’s one of the best guitar players I’ve ever played with, (2) he recorded the guitar tracks for all of Hanneke’s work and some of mine on this site, and (3) he’s my awesome brother!

        Kevin had a response for you, Rob. He may log into the site to post it…alternatively, I’ll just copy in his comments in this thread if he doesn’t have time.

        Stay tuned!
        C

    • #8100
      Wafflestomper
      Participant

      Some of those strumming patterns are insane. The boom-thunk is about the limit of my ability. I was about to learn “Waiting for the Dawn”, as its become one of my favorite songs… I thought “Well, Waffle.. you’d better learn the guitar part so you can teach Mom et. al. back home”.

      Took all of two seconds and I was like “Nope”

      I can’t wrap my brain around sheet music.. so I have to relate time signatures to something. Jigs always reminded me of the sound a man hobbling around with a peg-leg thats about 3 inches too short.

      • This reply was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by Wafflestomper.
    • #8104
      Peter Willis
      Participant

      Also – I just remember hearing a Celtic guitar accompanist saying that you can say the following words to a slip jig, “buy the band a beer, buy the band a beer, buy the band a beer”. (Specific instructions – say the five words over about 1 second and repeat = a fast slip jig)
      If you preform, it works well as a teaching tool to get the audience into the rhythm – and they tend to buy you a beer.

    • #8105
      Roland White
      Moderator

      Hi Peter, I’m curious how that rhythm might be affected or change for different kinds of beer, like a 7.8% RPM from Bend and the kind that Casey and I attest as the best. Cheers. //;-) Roland

    • #8354
      Casey Willis
      Keymaster

      OK, Rob. Kevin’s reply via email is below:

      “Hi Rob,

      As Casey said, slip jigs are indeed in 9/8 time , as opposed to 6/8 for a regular jig (formally known as a “Double Jig”). Why the word “slip” is used for those particular tunes, unfortunately I’ve no idea.

      Best wishes,

      Kevin”

      I hope that provides the clarity you are looking for, sir. Thanks!!!

    • #8688
      robhanson
      Participant

      So far I have found the accents are 5 and 9. Two pairs of (quarter note/eighth notes) followed by a dotted quarter note?

      Kind Regards,

      rob hanson

    • #8694
      Roland White
      Moderator

      Hi Rob, I also have never found out why they are called Slip Jigs. I will say that with Patti on FV you might try a few Canadian jigs as they are very rhythmic and the bowing usually compliments the beat. Also fun and catchy sounding, many of them inspired by Celtic influences. Have fun and fiddle on Rob. Best Roland

    • #8696
      robhanson
      Participant

      Thank you all for you input! I like “Buy the band a beer”, it works for me and I know the folks that attend our jams will have fun with it.

      “Buy the band a beer”, “Buy the band a beer”, “Buy the band a beer”, “Buy the band a beer”, “Buy the band a beer”, “Buy the band a beer”,!

      Yes that will work! Again thanks!

      Kind Regards,

      rob hanson

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